Our team of Physical Therapists are here for you, offering In-Clinic or Video Chat physical therapy to meet your needs. We are observing the governor’s orders by wearing masks and requiring all patients and visitors wear a mask when in the clinic. We also offer free screenings to provide you with expert information before you decide on your choice for care. If you would like more information please give us a call!

Picking Yourself Up

Falls are an unfortunate truth for the aging adult.  While falls can lead to injury, many of them don’t, which should come as good news though.  Falling sometimes isn’t the problem though – it’s getting back up! We’ve all seen the “Help, I’ve fallen and I can’t get up!” Life Alert commercials.  They certainly brought this issue to the public eye. Life Alert and similar services are valuable for certain aging individuals. For many older adults, however, there’s a strong chance that you can get up from the ground, and it’s not as hard as you think.  

Most falls happen in the home, which means there’s a good chance that you’ll have furniture and other odds and ends around to help you out.  In these situations, there are a few things that can make getting back up much easier.  

  • Find something sturdy – A couch, bed, toilet, chair, tub frame, table… each room in your house should have something that you can use.  Whatever you find, you should be able to easily place your hand on a part of it to help you up. You also want to be absolutely sure that it isn’t going to tip or fall.  
  • Be creative – This video (linked here) has several creative means to use random stuff in your house (books, speakers, etc.) to create a makeshift chair to help you up.  It’s hard to have a clear head when you’ve just fallen, so be prepared. When you know what’s in your house, it allows you to figure out how to get yourself back up.  
  • Be prepared –  Practice getting up from the floor!  Try it in different rooms. It might be pretty easy in your living room, but the bathroom might have it’s own issues.  The steps to getting up from the floor are going to depend on what’s around you, but the goal is always the same: get your bottom on a higher surface.  Here’s some tips: 
    • Work your way to a half kneeling position.  This means you’ll have one knee on the ground (use pillows, blankets, or rugs for padding) and one foot on the ground.  
    • Stay close to your chair (or whatever you’re using).  You’ll usually want your leg in front to be closest to the chair.  
    • Try to get your hips up and onto the chair you’re aiming for.  Your center of mass is basically your bottom, so if you can get that onto a higher surface, the rest of you can follow.  The video referenced above has several different ways you can try to get your hips up onto a chair that don’t use the half-kneeling position.  

Falls are scary.  If you do fall, you want to make sure you know what to do.  Knowing and practicing how to get up from the floor gives you a plan, and that makes falls less of a worry.  

Got questions?  Feel limited in what you’re able to do?  The staff at Limitless Physical Therapy in Eugene, OR can show you how to discover your future without limits.  

***The above information, including text, images, and all other materials, is provided for educational purposes only, and not as a replacement or supplement to professional medical advice.  Please contact a certified healthcare professional or your primary physician for any personal concerns.

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Limitless Physical Therapy – Eugene
1020 Green Acres Road
Suite 11
Eugene, OR 97408
(541) 654-0274
Fax (541) 228-9121

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Limitless Physical Therapy - Albany
947 Geary St. SE
Albany, OR 97322
(541) 704-7770
Fax: (541) 704-7773

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Will Running Damage Your Knees? Studies Say No.

According to Eugene physical therapist Craig Iseli, this is a common question among both avid runners and those who may start running for exercise or to participate in that first 5K.

Will Running Damage Your Knees? Studies Say No.

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